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Oct 3, 2012 12:00pm EDT
politics happens the morning after the morning after. so, i think -- hearing talking about the election. i don't know how the election is going to come up and make no predictions but i do ask myself if romney gets smashed i don't think the political problem is we have a center left problem and we have a far right party that is a structural problem. the republican party has gone nuts in my view. they've been at war -- there's been a simultaneous -- they've been simultaneously at war with physics at the same time. on the deficit and biological l2 mac, some of them for sure. so the question to me is what happens the morning after this election if romney loses. he wasn't far right enough. i wonder if the morning after the morning after. people would say we have gone too far to the right and we need a different republican party which i think the country desperately needs because it needs to be center-left and it's the only way we agree to get big compromises on these issues. >> can i add the role of history suggests the clinton and ronald reagan the second term as the productive term, the big a
Oct 4, 2012 5:00pm EDT
in the next legislative session which is right around the corner. we know we have an election in just a few weeks and a lame-duck session and then we will be returning for the 113th congress so i appreciate you being here and i appreciate everybody being here for your session in washington and with that, this hearing is adjourned. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> we take you live now to georgetown university where we are waiting for discussion to get underway on the future of american democracy. while we wait for this event, here are some comments from first-time voters reacting to last night's presidential debate. the this from "washington journal." [inaudible conversations] >> host: first-time voters only, henry and greensboro north carolina, henry tell us your story. why are you a first-time voter quest. >> caller: i have always felt politics was politics but now when you say the 47%, what night you care about everybody in the next night 47%. i don't like a flip-flopper and to me it just sounds like a flip-flopper. and i don't understand. he wants to put
Oct 4, 2012 9:00am EDT
come back and you know, fred's points are well taken which is for a lot of voters, the election started last night. if he is going to have a come back in ohio, it started last night. >> and fred and then we are going to open it up for the rest of you folks -- president obama one last time and beat senator mccain by seven points. now, part of it was you know, 66% of the vote among 18 to 29-year-olds, 67% of the vote among latino voters. african-american was like 95-4 or something like that and the poll has shown the african-american vote is rocksolid for the president and the numbers extremely high so lets let's just sort of assume rough parity with last time. but the question was, as you suggested the turnout levels among latino voters and i would add young voters very much questionable and when i have gone on campuses i cannot find a pulse. you saw a registration table registered to voters. there might be a couple of people behind the table to register people and nobody in front of the table registering. there's there is just no pulse there. is it safe to say that a seven-point
Oct 3, 2012 9:00am EDT
. >> the important discussion today. >> many of you know that jon huntsman was elected governor of utah in 2004, when he compiled a very distinguished record. he oversaw major tax and health care reform and also major improvements in public education. following his service as governor he was appointed by president obama as the ambassador to china in 2009. he left that position to run for president and gained tremendous respect for his forthright discussion of important policy challenges. this fall, governor huntsman actually joined the brookings institution as a distinguished fellow, so we are pleased to call in our colleague. bart gordon is a practicing attorney and partner at k&l gates and also a distinguished fellow at the council on competitiveness. bard is a former u.s. representative from the state of tennessee. he served in congress for 26 years from 2007-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. bard is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of our new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol
Oct 2, 2012 9:00am EDT
referendum, upon which parliamentary elections were held which were open to multiple political parties, and now i tell you that syria is continuing to work with the patriotic elements in the opposition to build a new and pluralistic syria that meets the aspirations of its people. syria, at the same time, is determined to carry out its duties and to protect its people from jihadists and takfiri terrorism, which armed terrorist groups are using to spread chaos and create sedition among syrians and threaten their peaceful coexistence. mr. president, we heard from this podium, and on other platforms, some calls that were made by those who are ignorant of the fact or maybe ignoring them, or maybe contributing to their spread, calling on the president of the syrian arab republic to step down. this is blatant interference in the domestic affairs of syria, and the unity of its people and its sovereignty. the syrian people and only the syrian people are authorized to choose their own future and the form of their state, which accommodates all groups throughout the entire spectrum of the syrian p
Oct 5, 2012 12:00pm EDT
romney had in mind when he wanted to say states have rights. what about the city's rights to elect their own elected officials? and help do they own? when you say government interference, i understand you were talking about the federal government, but i heard mitt romney say that states' rights, is it the rights of the state's coming into the cities to overthrow the local municipalities? if that's a big government, small government, i don't know, is it controlled government? i think they have a right to control their own destiny in their own city. so the public is on the ballot in november, and i am turning everybody in michigan to vote down. we don't need dictatorship. it is a dictated view. >> host: thanks so much on the mall of the government in relation to the city and its relationship with federal government. and detroit. swb writes the government should do its job and maintain the general welfare. from debate news the numbers are in on how many people watched on television. more than 600 million watched the debate in this election cycle nearly 15 million were going to watch t
Oct 1, 2012 12:00pm EDT
're having about the policies is that we absolutely need male legislators and male elected officials who prioritize women's health and understand and care about these issues. men like the men we have on this panel tonight. but we need more women in office. [cheers and applause] some of the members of congress are known to say if women are not at the table, we're on the menu. and that needs to change. [laughter] um, so i really do hope that young women in college, in high school who are thinking about their career options, and i many of us -- i know many of us are thinking how do i make a difference in the world, how do i change things for the better, consider going into elected office as an option for how to do that and engaging in this process as a way to have that kind of impact. we've seen unprecedented numbers of pieces of legislation attacking women's access to health care over the last few years, and you can call that a war on whatever you want. i don't want to fight about the terminology. but we've seen those numbers, and one important way to change that is not only to vote based
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7